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Summer Enrichment

English (All Grade Levels)

English Department Summer Reading by Grade Level

Rising 9th

9TH GRADE

ALL LEVELS

Fred Chappell: I Am One of You Forever

(Note: There is no Faculty Seminar Reading for Rising 9th. Rising 9th graders will participate in faculty led technology training at the time of the faculty seminar discussions.)

Rising 10th

10TH GRADE

ALL LEVELS

Faculty Seminar Choice

TRANSFER STUDENTS: Click here for a list of available Faculty Choice Summer Reading Selections for Transfer Students.

 

Faculty Seminar Choice
Kriah Le’Hanaah—Reading for Pleasure

Before the end of the school year, students selected the book they will read for the Faculty Seminar discussion. During the first month of school, students will participate in seminar discussions led by faculty based on these selections. Faculty members may request that students complete pre-discussion activities. Our goals are to encourage students to become life-long readers who read critically, insightfully, and enjoyably, to give our faculty and staff an opportunity to model the behaviour of life-long readers, to familiarize our students with authors and literary works that include a range of genres and universal themes transcending time and place, and to challenge our students to grow, to reach, to stretch, and to broaden their experience of what it means to be human.

Click here for a list of available Faculty Choice Summer Reading Selections for Transfer Students.

Note: Transfer students must email Michael Bennett with their Faculty Choice Summer Reading Selection.

How do I prepare?

Your first challenge and pleasure lies in a careful reading of your selected book. After you’ve read the book, select a passage (half a page to a full page) that you found particularly striking or significant and prepare to share your insights about this passage and your reasons for selecting it. Prepare two questions about the book that you would like to ask during the discussion. If your book is fiction, select the character who evoked the strongest response in you. Prepare to discuss this character’s traits and your reactions to this character’s change, growth, uniqueness, or other qualities in the character that interested you. If your book is nonfiction, select a chapter that most interested you and think about connections between this book and your own life.

Evaluation of Reading

During the first weeks of school, English teachers will assess students on the summer reading assignments through an in-class writing assignment. In order to prepare better for summer reading assessments, students should plan their time wisely and read carefully. The students can aid their long term retention of these works by taking notes based on the following questions and study areas:

  • Identify the main characters and their importance.
  • Identify the novel’s major theme or themes.
  • How do the plot, setting, point of view, symbols, and irony express the novel’s theme or themes?
  • Why types of conflicts are present?
  • What tone does the author express through the work’s events and characters?
  • What objects, persons, places, or events are given symbolic meaning?
  • If the work uses irony, what is its effect and why is it used?
  • In what way does this work heighten the reader’s sensitivity to the human condition?

Rising 11th

11th Grade CP and H Students 

  • Faculty Seminar Choice
  • Bryan Stevenson: Just Mercy 
     

11th Grade AP Lang Students

  • Faculty Seminar Choice
  • Bryan Stevenson: Just Mercy
  • Truman Capote: In Cold Blood

TRANSFER STUDENTS: Click here for a list of available Faculty Choice Summer Reading Selections for Transfer Students.

Faculty Seminar Choice
Kriah Le’Hanaah—Reading for Pleasure

Before the end of the school year, students selected the book they will read for the Faculty Seminar discussion. During the first month of school, students will participate in seminar discussions led by faculty based on these selections. Faculty members may request that students complete pre-discussion activities. Our goals are to encourage students to become life-long readers who read critically, insightfully, and enjoyably, to give our faculty and staff an opportunity to model the behaviour of life-long readers, to familiarize our students with authors and literary works that include a range of genres and universal themes transcending time and place, and to challenge our students to grow, to reach, to stretch, and to broaden their experience of what it means to be human.

Click here for a list of available Faculty Choice Summer Reading Selections for Transfer Students.

Note: Transfer students must email Michael Bennett with their Faculty Choice Summer Reading Selection.

How do I prepare?

Your first challenge and pleasure lies in a careful reading of your selected book. After you’ve read the book, select a passage (half a page to a full page) that you found particularly striking or significant and prepare to share your insights about this passage and your reasons for selecting it. Prepare two questions about the book that you would like to ask during the discussion. If your book is fiction, select the character who evoked the strongest response in you. Prepare to discuss this character’s traits and your reactions to this character’s change, growth, uniqueness, or other qualities in the character that interested you. If your book is nonfiction, select a chapter that most interested you and think about connections between this book and your own life.

Evaluation of Reading

During the first weeks of school, English teachers will assess students on the summer reading assignments through an in-class writing assignment. In order to prepare better for summer reading assessments, students should plan their time wisely and read carefully. The students can aid their long term retention of these works by taking notes based on the following questions and study areas:

  • Identify the main characters and their importance.
  • Identify the novel’s major theme or themes.
  • How do the plot, setting, point of view, symbols, and irony express the novel’s theme or themes?
  • Why types of conflicts are present?
  • What tone does the author express through the work’s events and characters?
  • What objects, persons, places, or events are given symbolic meaning?
  • If the work uses irony, what is its effect and why is it used?
  • In what way does this work heighten the reader’s sensitivity to the human condition?

Rising 12th

12th Grade CP and H Students

  • Faculty Seminar Choice
     

12th Grade AP Lang Students

  • Faculty Seminar Choice
  • John Krakauer: Into the Wild by 
  • Michael Finkel: The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit
     

12th Grade AP Lit Students

  • Faculty Seminar Choice
  • Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice
  • Tayari Jones: An American Marriage

TRANSFER STUDENTS: Click here for a list of available Faculty Choice Summer Reading Selections for Transfer Students.

Faculty Seminar Choice
Kriah Le’Hanaah—Reading for Pleasure

Before the end of the school year, students selected the book they will read for the Faculty Seminar discussion. During the first month of school, students will participate in seminar discussions led by faculty based on these selections. Faculty members may request that students complete pre-discussion activities. Our goals are to encourage students to become life-long readers who read critically, insightfully, and enjoyably, to give our faculty and staff an opportunity to model the behaviour of life-long readers, to familiarize our students with authors and literary works that include a range of genres and universal themes transcending time and place, and to challenge our students to grow, to reach, to stretch, and to broaden their experience of what it means to be human.

Click here for a list of available Faculty Choice Summer Reading Selections for Transfer Students.

Note: Transfer students must email Michael Bennett with their Faculty Choice Summer Reading Selection.

How do I prepare?

Your first challenge and pleasure lies in a careful reading of your selected book. After you’ve read the book, select a passage (half a page to a full page) that you found particularly striking or significant and prepare to share your insights about this passage and your reasons for selecting it. Prepare two questions about the book that you would like to ask during the discussion. If your book is fiction, select the character who evoked the strongest response in you. Prepare to discuss this character’s traits and your reactions to this character’s change, growth, uniqueness, or other qualities in the character that interested you. If your book is nonfiction, select a chapter that most interested you and think about connections between this book and your own life.

Evaluation of Reading

During the first weeks of school, English teachers will assess students on the summer reading assignments through an in-class writing assignment. In order to prepare better for summer reading assessments, students should plan their time wisely and read carefully. The students can aid their long term retention of these works by taking notes based on the following questions and study areas:

  • Identify the main characters and their importance.
  • Identify the novel’s major theme or themes.
  • How do the plot, setting, point of view, symbols, and irony express the novel’s theme or themes?
  • Why types of conflicts are present?
  • What tone does the author express through the work’s events and characters?
  • What objects, persons, places, or events are given symbolic meaning?
  • If the work uses irony, what is its effect and why is it used?
  • In what way does this work heighten the reader’s sensitivity to the human condition?

AP Calculus AB/BC

Students registered for AP Calculus AB/BC are required to complete the following summer work prior to the first day of the new school year. The work consists of a reading/writing component and a problem-solving component. The assignment is due on the first day of class. If you have any questions, please email Dean of Mathematics Riley Clark.

Click here to download AP Calculus AB/BC Summer Work.

Calculus Honors

If you are registered for Calculus Honors next year, there is work for you to do over the summer to prepare for this class; it is an assignment on a platform called deltamath.  If you have already used this, wonderful!  You're ahead of the game.  If not, please follow the instructions below to make an account and link it with our class.  There is only one assignment available, but it's pretty long, so don't wait until the last minute.  The assignment is due at the beginning of the day on the first day of school (August 12th).

  1. Go to deltamath.com
  2. In the upper right corner, click "Create Account," and choose "Student."
  3. When prompted, enter the teacher code 376804.
  4. Select the class "Calculus Honors"
  5. Fill in the information requested.  Use your weberschool.org email address.
  6. You will then be redirected to the login page.  Log back in and get started!

 

This looks super-long, but each topic only has a few questions associated with it.  Do a few at a time and it won't take forever.