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Summer Enrichment

English - All Grades

Summer Reading Philosophy

The English Department at The Weber School believes in the importance of encouraging students to continue their pursuit of knowledge through reading. In conjunction with the school’s goal of educating the whole person, the summer reading program will not only enhance academic skills such as critical thinking, literary analysis and vocabulary building, but it will also allow our students to become more aware of and sensitive to the human condition. Lastly, we hope to emphasize and instill a life-long appreciation and love of reading.


Faculty Seminar Choice

Prior to the end of the school year, students selected the book they will read for the Faculty Seminar discussion.

Rising 9th graders will participate in faculty led technology training at the time of the faculty seminar discussions.,

Evaluation of Reading

During the first weeks of school, English teachers will assess students on the summer reading assignments through an in-class writing assignment. In order to prepare better for summer reading assessments, students should plan their time wisely and read carefully. The students can aid their long term retention of these works by taking notes based on the following questions and study areas:

  • Identify the main characters and their importance.
  • Identify the novel’s major theme or themes.
  • How do the plot, setting, point of view, symbols, and irony express the novel’s theme or themes?
  • Why types of conflicts are present?
  • What tone does the author express through the work’s events and characters?
  • What objects, persons, places, or events are given symbolic meaning?
  • If the work uses irony, what is its effect and why is it used?
  • In what way does this work heighten the reader’s sensitivity to the human condition?

Faculty Seminar Choice Summer Reading Selections for Transfer Students

Students in grades 10-12 are required to read books selected for study by faculty and staff members. Students will select which book they will study from the provided list of books below. During the first month of the 2018-2019 school year, students will participate in seminar discussions led by faculty and staff based on these selections. Students will compose a timed in-class essay based on the agreed upon text in their English class prior to the seminar discussion. No student may elect to complete their timed writing essay on a different text.

In order to prepare better for summer reading assessments, students should plan their time wisely and read carefully. The students can aid their long term retention of these works by taking notes based on the following questions and study areas:

  • Identify the main characters and their importance.
  • Identify the novel’s major theme or themes.
  • How do the plot, setting, point of view, symbols, and irony express the novel’s theme or themes?
  • Why types of conflicts are present?
  • What tone does the author express through the work’s events and characters?
  • What objects, persons, places, or events are given symbolic meaning?
  • If the work uses irony, what is its effect and why is it used?
  • In what way does this work heighten the reader’s sensitivity to the human condition?

Click here for a list of available Faculty Choice Summer Reading Selections for Transfer Students.

Transfer students should email Michael Bennett, Dean of Student Affairs, with their book selection.

AP Psychology

Reading Assignment

The book: ‘Classic Case Studies in Psychology’ Geoff Rolls

Click here to view and purchase the book on Amazon.

There are 22 case studies in this book. You are reading 7 (you choose which ones).

Written Assignment

Your written assignment is in two parts.

This assignment is to be handwritten unless you have accommodations to type work.

(A) Write 7 “reflections” which convey your thoughts on specific passages/case studies in the book. Each of the 7 reflections should be at most a page in length.

One case study = one reflection

Begin with a quote or a synopsis of an issue taken from the book, one that gets you thinking.

Then create a well-written response, developing your ideas carefully. Your responses can include critiques, questions, disagreements, ideas you like (explaining why), comparisons to other things you have read, connections to your personal experiences. Have fun with this, but develop your thoughts and express them clearly. This exercise is designed to get you thinking more deeply as you read. Credit will relate to the quality of your writing.

(B) Write a critical review of the 7 case studies you chose. This review should be in the form of a brief essay, one or two pages. Give me a sense of how useful/not useful you found this book. Was it interesting? Why?/Why not? Which parts were more appealing to you? Would you recommend this book to others? Was it difficult to read?

This assignment is due on the first day of class. Staple your work together in order and turn into class box (at the back of class). If you have accommodations, print out and staple together, put in box.

Please email Charlie McQuade, Social Studies teacher, with any questions.

AP World History

Reading Assignment

Book: A History of the World in 6 Glasses, by Tom Standage

Click here to purchase the book on Amazon.

Written Assignment

Do not answer all of the following questions. Choose 3 drinks and answer the questions for those 3 only. However, the epilogue questions must be answered in addition to the 3 drinks.

Answer the questions completely on a separate paper (handwritten) unless you have typing accommodations. You must answer in complete sentences. This is an individual piece of work.

BEER

  1. How is the discovery of beer linked to the growth of the first “civilizations”?
  2. What does this history of beer tell us about the early civilizations?
  3. What sources does the author use to gather his information on the use of beer?
  4. What were some of the uses of beer by ancient cultures? Nourishment? Ritual?Religion?
  5. How did beer “civilize” man, according to Standage?


WINE

  1. How did the use of wine differ from that of beer in ancient Greece and Rome?
  2. How was wine used by the Greeks?
  3. How and why did wine develop into a form of a status symbol in Greece?
  4. How did the use of wine in Roman culture differ from that of ancient Greece?
  5. What is the relationship between wine and empire, medicine, and religion?

SPIRITS

  1. What is the origin of distilled spirits?
  2. What is the connection between spirits and colonization?
  3. How was the production of spirits connected to slavery?
  4. What role did spirits play on the high seas?
  5. In the 18th century, how did spirits help Britain have a more superior navy than France?
  6. Why were spirits an important staple in Colonial America?
  7. How did rum play a role in the American Revolution?

COFFEE

  1. Who did Europeans get coffee from and how did it spread to Europe?
  2. Why was it so important to Europe’s development that many people’s beverage of choice switched from alcohol to coffee?
  3. Describe coffee’s effect on the global balance of power (in terms of commerce).
  4. How did coffee play a pivotal role in the scientific revolution? (give lots of detail)
  5. How did coffee play a pivotal role in the ‘financial revolution’?
  6. How did coffee play a pivotal role in the French Revolution? (give lots of detail
  7. and go into the Enlightenment)

TEA

  1. When did tea first become a mainstream drink in Asia? In Europe?
  2. How did the consumption of tea in Europe differ from how it was consumed in China or Japan?
  3. If tea arrived in Europe around the same time as when coffee did, why did it not find the immediate success that coffee had?
  4. How did tea transform English society? Who were its main consumers and what were some of the new rituals that surrounded tea?
  5. How was tea an integral part of the Industrial Revolution?
  6. What was the connection between tea and politics?
  7. How was tea connected to the opium trade and the Opium War of 1839-1842?
  8. What role did the tea trade and production play in the British rule over India?

COCA COLA

  1. What was the origin of coke?
  2. How was this beverage used medicinally and what were the
  3. What was the relationship of coke and World War II?
  4. How was coke thought of by the communist during the Cold War?
  5. What is meant by “globalization in a bottle”?
  6. How did Coca-Cola become basically seen as an American value? How did this help and hurt Coca-Cola (and, in some ways, America itself?)

EPILOGUE

  1. Describe how the scientific advancements of the 19th century brought the history of beverages full circle.
  2. Which water’s quality is more tightly controlled-tap or bottled?
  3. How many people have no access to safe water today?
  4. How has access to water affected international relations?
  5. Give a personal reflection of the book as a whole - how useful was the book in helping you understand certain aspects of World History?

This assignment is due on the first day of class. Bring your answers to school and put them in your class box at the back of class. If you have accommodations, type and print out.


AP Chemistry

In order to start the school year prepared, please complete this summer assignment. It will be counted as your first assignment grade, but most importantly, it will help prepare you for your first test.

The first test in AP Chemistry will take place during the first week of school and will cover the content of this review assignment.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at jwhitehead@weberschool.org.


Click here to view and print the AP Chemistry Summer Assignment in Google Docs.

The summer assignment represents some of what you learned in your first year of chemistry. This is your opportunity to brush up on your skills or fill in the gaps in your knowledge.

Do NOT wait until the last week of summer to begin this assignment. At first glance this may look overwhelming, but if you make a schedule at the beginning of the summer it will be very manageable.

It is your responsibility to print out all of the worksheets. The entire packet is due on the first day of school.

These are the objectives for the summer assignment:

  • Be able to correctly use scientific notation and significant figures
  • Be able to use dimensional analysis to convert between units
  • Know how to classify matter as a mixture, pure substance, element, compound, heterogeneous or homogeneous mixture
  • Know the scientists who discovered the parts of the atom, how they did it, and in what order
  • Be able to determine the number of protons, electrons, and neutrons in an atom using a variety of data including atomic mass, atomic number, a periodic table, and charge
  • Differentiate between atomic mass and atomic number
  • Differentiate between protons, neutrons, and electrons according to charge, mass, and location within the atom
  • Differentiate between ions and isotopes
  • Know how to use the periodic table to determine the charge of the most stable ion of an element
  • Be able to name and write formulas for ionic compounds, covalent compounds, and acids
  • Memorize the polyatomic ions to be used in naming acids and ionic compounds
  • Be able to write a balanced chemical equation from a word equation
  • Be able to use a computer program to graph data and obtain a best fit curve
  • Be aware of safety rules and the names of basic lab equipment

Assignments

  1. Memorize polyatomic ions
  • Make flashcards for each of the polyatomic ions listed in this attachment
  • Be able to name when given formula, or write the formula when given the name
  • Watch attached video
  1. Scientific Notation and Significant Figures
  1. Dimensional Analysis
  1. Classification of Matter and Physical/Chemical Changes
  1. Atomic Discoveries
  1. Atomic Structure
  1. Introduction to the Periodic Table
  1. Naming Ionic Compounds
  • Read textbook pp. 56-63
  • Watch attached videos: 1 and 2
  • Complete Worksheet #7
  1. Naming Covalent Compounds
  1. Naming Acids and Organic Compounds
  1. Nomenclature all together
  1. Balancing Equations
  1. Graphing in Chemistry
  1. Safety and Equipment

AP Calculus AB/BC

Students registered for AP Calculus AB/BC are required to complete the following summer work prior to the first day of the new school year. The work consists of a reading/writing component and a problem-solving component. The assignment is due on the first day of class. If you have any questions, please email Dean of Mathematics Riley Clark.

Reading/Writing Assignments

Review each of the following documents. You will be expected to be familiar with the content in each of these documents.

  • AP Calculus Course Description (60 pages) Pay special attention to pages 4-24 and pages 40-47.

https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-calculus-ab-and-bc-course-and-exam-description.pdf

  • How to Study Math (11 pages)

http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/getfile.aspx?file=B,15,N

Answer the question(s) relating to each reading assignment per the directions below.

College Board’s AP Calculus Course Description (250-500 words)

Why does the College Board emphasize conceptual understanding (the understanding of concepts coupled with the ability to make connections between, and among, other concepts, to communicate them effectively, and to utilize them in problem solving) in AP Calculus so much, even of prerequisite subjects and topics, when prior math classes emphasized procedural fluency (the ability to master procedural skills needed to perform mathematical computations and procedures)?

How might the emphasis on conceptual understanding benefit your success in this course, preparation for college, career achievement, and development as a lifelong learner?

What challenges does this emphasis present to you as a student?

How to Study Math (250-500 words)

How do you typically study for math class? Do you study before quizzes, tests, and/or finals? If so, how much time typically do you spend?

How much time per school night do you spend studying for math, not including doing homework? Same question but including doing homework?

Which of these tips do you already follow when you take a mathematics course? How are they helpful?

Are there any of these tips that you have not used before that might help you in AP Calculus? Why do you think so?

Are there any tips that are not mentioned that you believe are helpful? How are they helpful?

All assignment submissions must:

  1. respond to the prompts;
  2. be well-written;
  3. adhere to the word count requirement;
  4. use one-inch margins, 12-point Cambria Math font, and double line spacing;
  5. be consolidated into one stapled document, in the order listed on the first page of this document.

Papers may be double-sided. Unless otherwise specified, it is acceptable to write your responses to an assignment as a list of questions and their answers. Use section headings, as needed, to separate areas of focus in your writing.

Problem Solving

These pages are a review of important prerequisite topics that appear in AP Calculus. Each page includes a description of the topic with examples as well as an assignment. Complete each assignment (there are 15 of them). Write the answers on the assignment pages, but show work on a separate sheet of paper (if there is no work to show for a problem, simply write the answer on the assignment page).

Click here to download the assignment pages.

You must clearly identify which work goes with which assignment. For example, head a new sheet of paper “A. Functions” and include all work for that assignment.

Note: Pages C and R have only a description and examples but no assignment. Read the pages and make sure you are familiar with the information.